Tag Archives: research

‘Be A Mind Blower’ Crowdsource Competition

HENDERSON, Nev., Nov. 5 /PRNewswire/ -- Zyxio, the pioneer in next-generation
Human Media Interaction, announced today the launch of its "Be A Mind Blower"
online competition, allowing the public to submit their most innovative and
creative ideas for product development in a variety of categories, utilizing
Zyxio's new patented breath-enabled technology SensaWaft(TM).  The five most
ingenious applicants will be selected by the public to sit on the company's
special "Mind Blowing Advisory Board" for a six month period to assist with
the development of the new products.  They will also receive $6,000 and an
all-expense paid three day trip to Las Vegas. 

Imagine breathing out to flick through icons.  Or, think of exhaling and swap
gears in your favorite video game, hands busy on the controller.  With
SensaWaft(TM) technology, this soon could be a possibility.  "Be A Mind
Blower" gives anyone 16-years-old and older and legally authorized to work in
the United States a chance to be involved in advising Zyxio on the development
of its next breath-enabled project.  Applicants simply submit an idea online
in the following categories: PC/laptops/netbooks,
games/multimedia/entertainment, assistive/multimodal/virtual reality,
smartphones/in-vehicle/enterprise and digital music/graphic design.  

Additionally, anyone is eligible to enter as a judge to rate submissions on a
5-point scale from "Are you out of your mind?!" (one point) to "Genius, I Say
Yes!" (five points).  Submissions with the most points at the end of the six
week competition will win.  "Be A Mind Blower" has extended judging to the
public to allow those who may not have their own ideas to participate in the
process and believes that the best ideas should be decided by the public at
large, not a small group of corporate executives.  All judges are
automatically entered into a sweepstakes with the chance to win a Samsung
Go(TM) netbook or a Motorola Droid(TM) Phone.  Two of each product will be
given away at the end of the competition.  

"We believe that involving users in the development process of our future
products is of utmost importance as they will be the ones incorporating our
unique touchless technology into their everyday lives," says Pierre Bonnat
co-founder, Zyxio. "The scope of applications for our intuitive technology is
limitless, and we are turning to the public, rather than a focus group or test
panel, to give us direction by electing the most innovated and useful ideas.
Our job then is to tailor the technology to fit their choices."

After the initial five week submission period ending on November 30, 2009,
applicants will be narrowed to the top 25.  The finalists will have the
ability to promote their ideas utilizing blogs, videos and social networks
within the "Be a Mind Blower" Web site.  The five winners will then be
selected according to their points score. 

Through this competition Zyxio is introducing an incomparable proprietary
technology called SensaWaft(TM), an intuitive solution that senses and
analyzes when one intentionally breathes to interact. It was developed based
on human interactional behavior, and utilizes the untapped potential of the
kinetic energy of breath to control digital screens.

"Be a Mind Blower" competition runs from November 5th, 2009 at 12.00 pm PST to
December 13th, 2009 at 11.59 p.m. PST.
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New Pepsi ‘Dewmocracy’ Push Threatens to Crowd Out Shops

Source with compliments from http://adage.com/agencynews/article?article_id=140120

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) — The trend of marketers relying on the wisdom of crowds to create marketing campaigns is escalating as PepsiCo turns over the choice of agencies for three product launches to the masses, ramping up the potential threat to ad shops bypassed or relegated to a supporting role in implementing the resulting efforts.

 

Consumers voted on the color they wanted for three new Dewmocracy products and then a paintball of that color was shot at volunteers. The volunteer covered with the most paint at the end won.
Consumers voted on the color they wanted for three new Dewmocracy products and then a paintball of that color was shot at volunteers. The volunteer covered with the most paint at the end won.

In a contest beginning this month, Mtn Dew will hand off marketing duties, at least temporarily, for a $100 million-plus business to several potentially unknown players selected by consumers. Via the contest, any agency, independent film company or individual can submit 12-second clips via www.12seconds.tv outlining their ideas for marketing three new Mtn Dew line extensions.

Those line extensions themselves were created by the crowd. Distortion, Whiteout and Typhoon are the latest results of Dewmocracy, an initiative designed to open up product development to consumers. Last year, the Dewmocracy brands accounted for 25 million cases — or a couple hundred million dollars, according to John Sicher, editor and publisher of Beverage Digest. By comparison, Coke Zero, a major growth engine and core brand for Coca-Cola, sold 96 million cases last year.

“It really is a good piece of business for a line extension, even in this big a category,” Mr. Sicher said.

When Dewmocracy launched in 2007, it involved an online game. This time around, Mtn Dew is using Facebook, Twitter and its private online Dew Labs Community to determine the flavor, color, packaging and names of the new products. Now, it’s also allowing consumers to select the agencies that will produce 15-second spots for each of the new flavors. Digital advertising and point-of-sale materials could also become a part of the mix. Once the flavors and advertising break in April 2010, consumers will vote to determine which flavor will become a permanent part of the Mtn Dew lineup.

Fate of BBDO
Mtn Dew is adamant that the new effort will not impact its relationship with agency of record BBDO Worldwide, noting that it has been a part of Dewmocracy from the beginning and continues to play an important role in the process. BBDO directed a call for comment to the client.

Brett O’Brien, Mtn Dew’s director-marketing, said that the broadcast spots created by the selected agencies will be supported by a “robust media plan,” noting that marketing is a key part of the Dewmocracy process.

“If we’re going to have a dialogue with consumers and have consumers play a role in dictating the future of our brand, they’ve got to play a role in all aspects of it,” said Mr. O’Brien of the decision to let consumers select agencies.

Crowd-sourcing is a growing phenomenon among major brands such as Unilever and Amazon. Frito-Lay’s Doritos brand has run three consecutive “Crash the Super Bowl” campaigns, which ask consumers to vote on their favorite consumer-generated spot. The latest contest offered a $1 million prize if the winner topped the USAToday ad poll, which it did. But while contests like that have been decidedly gimmicky, a more troubling trend for agencies is emerging. This fall, Unilever’s Peperami brand dismissed Lowe, London, in favor of running a contest to find TV and print ad ideas. Just this month, two former senior managers at Crispin Porter & Bogusky launched Victors & Spoils, billed as the world’s first creative agency built on crowd-sourcing principles.

“Most agency relationships, they’re still the brand steward. They understand the brand they’re working with at an almost molecular level,” said Chick Foxgrover, 4A’s chief information officer. “It’s unclear whether [crowd-sourcing] will be a trend that takes hold in a universal way or whether it’s more of an experiment. … In general, there’s a lot of experimentation going on in agency compensation. This fits into the context of that larger conversation.”

Outside perspective
Mr. O’Brien said the review will be promoted to indie agencies, indie film companies, universities and film schools, as well as via online messaging and word-of-mouth. BBDO handled advertising for the previous Dewmocracy product launches. This time, BBDO will work on an umbrella spot that explains the overall Dewmocracy program, while the selected agencies work independently on the launch creative.

“I don’t know … that they’ll bring something different — certainly they may have a different perspective,” Mr. O’Brien said about the prospect of using a smaller agency or a film company, rather than a large, traditional agency. “It lets us get an interesting and unique perspective on the brand from people that aren’t living and breathing it every day.”

Asked whether the agencies tapped for the product launches could pick up more Mtn Dew business, Mr. O’Brien said he didn’t know, adding that “it’s certainly TBD.” PepsiCo has worked with small agencies in the past, especially in the digital space, and recently tapped Interpublic Group of Cos. digital agency Huge to handle a piece of business for brand Pepsi.

Mtn Dew has been one of the few trademarks growing in the carbonated soft-drink space, with volume up 1% in the first half, as the overall category declined 2.7%, according to Beverage Digest.

“[Dewmocracy] contributes to our growth. … The Dew fan is excited about engaging with new offerings from Dew. But it also attracts new people into the Dew fan base that say, ‘hey, this is something really interesting, let me give it a try,'” explained Mr. O’Brien. “And retailers love it, because it’s interesting news that drives folks into the stores.”

When campaigns go to the crowds

Crowd-sourcing isn’t new, but it’s increasingly popular, with major brands turning to consumers to create marketing for all sorts of products.

AMAZON: The online retailer turned to consumers this year for TV concepts, eventually awarding $20,000 to the winner, a photographer based in Los Angeles.

CAREERBUILDER: In May, CareerBuilder dropped Wieden & Kennedy. That same month it began promoting the HireMyTvAd contest. The winning ad could be shown during the 2010 Super Bowl.

CHEVROLET: In 2006, a contest to create ads for the Chevy Tahoe resulted in anti-SUV spoofs, but it did garner plenty of attention.

DORITOS: For three years running, the Frito-Lay brand has run a “Crash the Super Bowl” campaign featuring consumer-generated ads.

HP: To promote its Artist Edition laptops, HP launched the You on You Project this summer. It asked consumers to upload videos or remix a commercial using stock footage.

PEPERAMI: The Unilever snack brand dismissed Lowe, London, earlier this year in favor of a crowd-sourcing strategy to find new ideas for TV and print.

 

Corporate Social Responsibility + Social Media = Promise of Transformation

Sourced with compliments from

http://www.csrwire.com/csrlive/commentary_detail/1257-Corporate-Social-Responsibility-Social-Media-Promise-of-Transformation

“This is a world of transparency, openness, two-way dialogue with your constituents… I just think that’s part of the game today.” So said GE CEO Jeff Immelt in response to a question I posed to him, on how his company uses web 2.0 tools to engage with its stakeholders on sustainability issues, last week at the Web 2.0 Summit in San Francisco (see it here – scroll to 23:15). “If you’re not willing to be completely transparent on just about everything you do, and if you can’t tolerate life in a world where you’re sharing information openly and getting input from lots of different people, where they have the ability to critique, criticize, have inputs… you better find a new profession,” he said.

I was there gathering material for a research fellowship I’m conducting with Marcy Murninghan and Bob Massie on web 2.0 and corporate accountability for the Harvard-Kennedy Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative, with the Summit sandwiched between the JustMeans Social Media for Sustainability and the Business for Social Responsibility conferences. The week’s takeaways: web 2.0 holds great promise to transform the way companies engage with stakeholders, but we are still way early in the innovation curve on using web 2.0 to advance corporate sustainability and accountability!

That said, web 2.0 has already radically transformed conference power dynamics: gone is the one-way transmission of information from the stage that privileges presenters; now, thanks to Twitter and hashtags, the audience voices itself in a meta-dialogue transpiring in real-time during presentations. For example, we who followed the #justmeans hashtag throughout that conference participated in creating a steady stream of comments, criticisms, questions – and “distillations” that I characterized as a “subtle art,” sometimes capturing points better than they’re presented. Kudos to Natural Logic CEO Gil Friend for best distillation — of InnoCentive CEO Dwayne Spradlin: “Crowdsourcing vs outsourcing requires profound organizational change.”

Harnessing the power of crowdsourcing, “Getting the Message Out” panel moderator Chad Boettcher of Weber Shandwick projected the conference Twitter feed on the screen to display audience questions for Treehugger Founder Graham Hill, TriplePundit Co-Publisher Ryan Mickle, and JustMeans Managing Director Deb Berman. “I was really happy with this use of distributive technology,” said CSRwire Chair Joe Sibilia, who I ran into at both the JustMeans and BSR conferences.

Joe and I shared our concern about web 2.0 in the CSR space focusing exclusively on money-making opportunities, such as brand enhancement, to the distraction of more promising transformative opportunities, such as leveraging its connective power for movement-building. We agreed that the CSR-social media connection needs to balance its business case with its change agency.

Measuring financial or social return on investment remains elusive, however. In the “How to Calculate the ROI of Social Media” panel, “the panelists could not give one compelling business reason for the return on investment in using social networking tools,” said Joe. “Many of my colleagues are trying to measure the amount of time and effort to expend on this new technology, and that’s why we went. We left the meeting with an empty feeling about the content, with this question unanswered…”

Crowd Control

Sourced with compliments from http://www.adweek.com/aw/content_display/news/agency/e3i26911e62ce1ee0f724c394f5d3d7d664

Crispin Porter + Bogusky recently ignited an online debate and protest campaign on Twitter when it crowdsourced the design of a product logo for Brammo, an electric motorcycle start-up. Criticism mostly focused on the high-end agency taking such a low-cost route, as well as its putting creative into the hands of outsiders when experts were not just available, but the very ones passing it off.

For Brammo, crowdsourcing was more than just a way to stretch its budget. “We wanted to blur the line between [who works for Brammo] and [our] products,” says Brian Wismann, the company’s director of product development. “And it created its own buzz.”

Crowdsourcing creative — which includes user-generated contests, and receiving input on briefs and designs — is an increasingly popular option for marketers that want to add a consumer-engagement punch to their campaigns. It’s also controversial. Detractors call it gimmicky, say it encourages low-quality creative, and eschews strategic thinking and relationship management. But love it or hate it, this much seems clear: Not only is crowdsourcing here to stay, it’s picking up steam.

HP, for one, recently doled out $300,000 in prizes for its You on You Project, which asked participants to create Web videos in the style of its campaign, “The computer is personal again.” And Microsoft, pushing the idea that its users contributed to the development of its Windows 7 operating system, is asking for 7-second video demos for a Web series highlighting its features. Gayle Troberman, gm for advertising and consumer engagement at Microsoft, says, “The masses are the best way to deliver a message.”

But ad professionals who view crowdsourcing as a gimmick say these exercises are nothing but sweepstakes for the digital era. And because they’re driven by a desire for consumer interaction, they note, they’re more about the process than the final product.

“I’m interested in the high end of marketing creativity and production, and don’t think you can get anything high end” with crowdsourcing, says Benjamin Palmer, co-founder of The Barbarian Group. “By definition you’re asking people [to contribute] who are not at the top of their field.”

Some, however, believe creative does not have to suffer. Last month, Unilever, after working with Lowe London for the past 15 years on Peperami, decided to turn the brief for its next campaign over to members of ideabounty.com. “We felt we could get … even better content by opening up the brief to more people than we would typically get from an agency or agency team,” says Matt Burgess, managing director at Unilever U.K. So far, he adds, they’ve received 1,200 submissions.

Others point to Frito-Lay’s Doritos consumer-generated ads for the Super Bowl — the last one of which topped the USA Today poll that many marketers use as a metric of game-day success — as an example of crowdsourcing that delivers if not quality creative, qualitative success.

Economic motivators may certainly help drive the growth of crowdsourcing. For a brand like Brammo — which gave $1,000 each to five winners of its contest — crowdsourcing meant the agency could provide a service the client might not otherwise have been able to afford.

Burgess says Unilever sees huge cost savings with crowdsourcing. Ideabounty, he explains, told them to “put up $10,000 … as the appropriate reward, which is well below what you would pay an agency for their idea.” Unilever will produce the winning idea with a production partner.

“We would not have done this just for commercial reasons alone,” Burgess adds. “It’s to get our advertising from good to great.”

Not everyone claims savings: Doritos’ director of marketing, Rudy Wilson, says, “At the end of the day, we’re spending money to get awareness of this program out. The money we’re saving is being repurposed.”

Steve Simpson, partner and creative director at Goodby, Silverstein & Partners, an agency whose clients include Doritos, HP and Netflix (which also has done consumer-generated content), says crowdsourcing is slowly maturing. “As crowdsourcing [grows] from being a gimmick, a big sloppy hug of Web 2.0 openness, the products and the process will become more professional,” he says. “The crudity of the pioneers will be scorned and the work will begin to show more finesse.”

A few ex-Crispin staffers are so confident in the wisdom of crowds that they’ve just launched Victors & Spoils, a shop based on the principles of crowdsourcing. On his blog, co-founder John Winsor describes the creative department as being staffed with traditional art directors and copywriters as well as “a global digital community.”

Of course, the more crowdsourcing grows in popularity, the more the “crowds” may demand more than a stack of cash for their contributions.

“Who knows how many of the ideas that don’t win prizes nonetheless influence a company’s thinking down the line — without payment to the contributors,” says Simpson. “Crowdsourcing is here to stay, but expect both parties to it to begin to cast a colder, more businesslike eye at the other.”

 

Unilever to extend crowdsourcing to other brands – Revolution Magazine

Sourced with compliments from http://www.revolutionmagazine.com/news/948330/Unilever-extend-crowdsourcing-brands/

LONDON – Unilever is looking to extend the crowdsourcing initiative being trailed with Peperami to other brands in its international portfolio, which includes Lynx, Marmite and Persil.

Simon Clift, the FMCG giant’s global chief marketing officer, is considering a number of different crowdsourcing proposals that could be rolled out in multiple markets.

“Unilever is looking into crowdsourcing ideas that we can learn from and implement across our brands,” confirmed Noam Buchalter, marketing manager at Unilever. “We have our eyes and ears open to new ways of creating advertising.”

The brand-owner is currently offering $10,000 (£6,087) in a competition to find ideas for its next TV campaign for snack food brand Peperami.

Unilever has received 1,200 responses to the brief for a TV and print campaign featuring its Animal character. Ideas have been submitted to a specially created website called Idea Bounty, with the winner set to be turned into a TV ad with the help of specialist agency Smartworks.

In August, the crowdsourcing initiative saw Peperami part company with its ad Lowe after 16 years. Unilever has no plans to retain an agency for the Peperami account. Buchalter said: “Crowdsourcing is a sustainable way for Peperami to make advertising.”

 

Crowdsourcing and Regression Analysis of Polls; Can We Help Prove That Oklahomans Are Not That Dumb?

Sourced with compliments from

http://www.examiner.com/x-24816-Denver-New-Technology-Examiner~y2009m9d27-Crowdsourcing-and-Regression-Analysis-of-Polls-Can-We-Help-Prove-That-Oklahomans-Are-Not-That-Dumb

One of the great things about the new high-tech world we live in is that serious nerds can be celebrated and given a chance to shine. For my money, the best source of election information from last year was not a pundit, or a candidate, but a baseball stats geek who started doing some excellent technical and statistical analysis of polling data. That site is fivethirtyeight.com, and the guy is Nate Silver.

Wipro logs on to ‘crowdsourcing’ mode

Sourced with compliments from http://www.ciol.com/News/News-Reports/Wipro-logs-on-to-crowdsourcing-mode/24909125511/0/

BANGALORE, INDIA: IT outsourcing major Wipro Technologies has started off with crowdsourcing by asking the page viewers to decide on their homepage theme. The company is looking forward to introducing the concept for white papers and featured articles as well.

The visitors of the Wipro Technologies homepage will be provided with an option to vote for their preferred homepage themes. The option with the majority of the votes would be highlighted on the homepage.